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Debonil Maity Wins Travel Award!

“Debonil Maity (pictured second from right), a second-year PhD student co-advised by Drs. Yun Chen and Sean Sun was selected for Travel Award to attend American Society of Cell Biology Annual Meeting at San Francisco in December. Debonil studies the effects of  hydrostatic pressure changes on the ECM and cells.  We congratulate Debonil  to be recognized for his good[…]

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Matt Pittman wins American Society of Cell Biology Travel Award!

“Matthew Pittman, a Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering undergraduate student from Dr. Yun Chen’s Lab of MAFIA was selected for Travel Award to attend American Society of Cell Biology Annual Meeting at San Francisco in December. Matt’s winning project  is high-throughput measurement of sub-pN forces generated by motile cells.  It is a rare honor for undergraduate students. Good job, Matt!”

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A novel membrane anchor for FtsZ is linked to cell wall hydrolysis in Caulobacter crescentus.

Meier EL1, Razavi S2, Inoue T2,3, Goley ED1. Abstract In most bacteria, the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ forms an annulus at midcell (the Z-ring) which recruits the division machinery and regulates cell wall remodeling. Although both activities require membrane attachment of FtsZ, few membrane anchors have been characterized. FtsA is considered to be the primary membrane[…]

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Shiva Razavi Wins Lucille Elizabeth Hay Graduate Fellowship Award!

The Isaac Morris Hay and Lucille Elizabeth Hay Graduate Fellowship Award was established to provide support for predoctoral students performing outstanding research in the field of cell biology. Awardees receive one year of stipend and medical insurance (September 1, 2016 – August 31, 2017). Two awards will be given in 2016 and future competitions will be held based on availability of funds.

Asymmetric Damage Segregation Constitutes an Emergent Population-Level Stress Reseponse

Highlights Lineages and growth rate distributions reveal effects of ADS Asymmetry of segregation is dependent on single-cell damage The population benefit of ADS increases with stress Summary Asymmetric damage segregation (ADS) is a mechanism for increasing population fitness through non-random, asymmetric partitioning of damaged macromolecules at cell division. ADS has been reported across multiple organisms,[…]